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Paternity Archives

Mia Farrow claims that her son is actually Frank Sinatra's

If your paternity rights are in question, you might be worried about how it will affect your time with your child. Likewise, though, paternity matters that aren't settled can lead to people asking for money, time and ruining your reputation. In any case, it's important to know exactly whose child is whose, and with a paternity test, you can have that chance. Louisiana natives who watch celebrity news might have heard the claim that Mia Farrow made recently. According to her, Frank Sinatra may be the real father to her son, Ronan.

Experts claim infancy is important to parental relationship

A new study conducted by researchers regarding children and their fathers may underscore an issue that some men in New Orleans are facing: paternity. Researchers studied the amount of paternity leave that men are receiving for newborn children and the results are mildly alarming. The results of the study indicated that 5 percent of new fathers get two or more weeks off. Seventy-five percent have a week or less of paternity leave while 16 percent do not have any time at all to spend with their newborn babies. This is important because the earliest moments of a children's life can be extremely important to developing a bond with a child.

New paternity tests help determine father even earlier

Not all parents get along with one another. This is underscored by the number of paternity disputes that have occurred in New Orleans. Many mothers and fathers have found themselves caught up in such a dispute, fighting over whether the man involved in the case is the father of the involved children or not. Researchers have been working toward ways for determining paternity for years and until recently, the earliest that the father of a fetus could be determined was nine weeks into the pregnancy. But thanks to technological advances, a new test can determine this as early as five weeks.

How could a sexual assault bill affect innocent fathers?

Men in New Orleans may not always get to hear what they want when their significant other has a child: that the child is theirs. But there are plenty of reasons that this may not be the case or that a woman would make this claim. Paternity disputes are not as rare as one might think and they give men the opportunity to prove that a child is theirs, not someone else's. Many men have been shortchanged by women who have managed to keep their children away with such claims and it seems that, in some states, there may be even more opportunity for this to happen.

Man sues clinic over ex-girlfriend's insemination

A 44-year-old man from Louisiana has claimed that an ex-girlfriend stole his sperm and had herself impregnated with it. According to reports, that man has filed a lawsuit against the operator of a sperm donation clinic where his sperm was reportedly stored for another woman, one that he has a 12-year-old child with. Now, he has another child, this one - now 2 years old - with the aforementioned ex-girlfriend. Paternity tests have determined that the child is his.

Establishing paternity by acting as the father

When a child is born in Louisiana, paternity can be established. But sometimes, fatherhood is not established at birth or is not known. In other cases, a man may claim paternity without being the actual father. This is what happened to one man who was married to the mother of a child, though courts said that he established his position as father in a way that some may argue against.

Mothers, know the benefits of admitting paternity

From time to time, new mothers in Louisiana do not know who the father of their children are. In other cases, mothers do not want to give the father of the child the rights that come with paternity so they deny the father by not admitting the man's fatherhood. This can cause a serious rift for the parenting relationship, but it can be mended and forced upon the mother through legal motions and DNA tests.

Mother will not acknowledge paternity of her child

The number of mothers who do not know the fathers of their children is high enough to discuss the topic of determining who that person is. Without an acknowledgement of paternity, a mother can be left without child support and the assistance in caring for a child that a father often brings. But what happens when a mother does not want to acknowledge that a man who believes he is the father is just that?

Doubts about paternity? Consider DNA test sooner not later

When a couple gives birth to a newborn child in Louisiana and the couple is married, the husband is placed on the birth certificate as the father without any second thoughts. But if the couple is not married or someone has doubts about whom the father is, what then? When paternity becomes an issue, there is at least one way that this can be confirmed: a DNA test.

Paternity testing has higher demand, more options

Parents in New Orleans and throughout the country sometimes wonder whether or not the father listed on a birth certificate is truly the biological relative of the child named. Because of this demand, one 42-year-old man took his DNA clinic and revamped it, turning it into a mobile paternity testing center. The clinic has given many parents answers to their doubts and questions already, but some experts believe that the mobile testing center is a cause for worry.

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